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Tag Archives: Waco

Greenwood Cemetery, Waco, McLennan County, Texas

Recently my husband and I made a trip to Hill County, Texas – the cemetery hunt was on!  After a very successful mission to the Covington area, we decided to stop in Waco on the way back to Austin.  I was aware that Lucinda Curbow Lytle and family were laid to rest in Greenwood Cemetery as is Martha Isabell Curbow’s second husband, Jonathan Monroe Bedwell.  While I already had photographs of the pertinent grave markers, I wanted to physically stand at Lucinda’s grave and pay her my respects. 

After getting lost a few times, and stumbling upon the much larger and more beautiful Oakwood Cemetery, we finally made our way to Greenwood! Greenwood Cemetery is located a stone’s throw away from busy IH-35 and lies on the southeast corner of Earle Avenue and Price Street in Waco, Texas. The City of Waco established Greenwood Cemetery in 1875, shortly after our Curbow family arrived in McLennan County.  I believe that Greenwood Cemetery was also at one time called “East Waco Cemetery” or “West Waco Cemetery,” depending on which section you were buried in; however, I cannot get a definitive answer on that from local historians.

Map - depicting location of Greenwood Cemetery in Waco, Texas

I felt sad when we walked the cemetery.  I tried to visualize what the cemetery must have looked like in the past; but, I had a hard time doing so.  Even though Greenwood Cemetery has a historical marker designation and is cared for by a cemetery association, in my estimation, it felt stark, forgotten and “unloved.” 

Historical Marker for Greenwood Cemetery, Waco, McLennan County, Texas

 The cemetery has a “white” section which is contained inside a chain-linked fence, and a “black” section which is outside the fenced area.  According to a gentleman that we ran into at the cemetery, the black section has suffered much from vandalism. Overall, the cemetery is bordered by a very underprivileged residential area and the concrete and noise of the freeway.  My husband and I walked the entire cemetery – and we could not find the Lytle plot.  Frustrated – knowing it was there – we were about to give up and just go home.  It took an older gentlemen (also working on his family history) to point out the Lytle plot – which we were practically standing right on top of – situated at the very entrance of the cemetery.  (Okay, so it had been a very long day!)  At one time the plot had been edged by a concrete border – but with the passage of time the concrete has partially sunk into the ground.  There is one marker for Edward and Lucinda; Edward and Belle each have their own marker; and wife Marguerite has one small stone.  It brought comfort to know that the entire family was laid to rest together. 

Greenwood Cemetery

Our family members that are laid to rest in Greenwood Cemetery are:

William Henry Lytle, confederate soldier;
Lucinda Curbow Lytle, daughter of Tilman P. Curbow;
Belle Sarah Lytle, daughter of William and Lucinda;
William Henry Lytle, Jr., son of William and Lucinda;
Marguerite Logan Lytle, wife of William Henry Lytle, Jr.; and
Jonathon Monroe Bedwell, husband of Martha Isabell Curbow.

If you wish to view any of the above memorials on the Find-a-Grave website, or if you wish to read any other memorials of folks buried at Greenwood, I am attaching the link here. 

This is an excerpt from The Story Tellers…..which says it all for me:  

How many times have I told the ancestors you have a wonderful family you would be proud of us? How many times have I walked up to a grave and felt somehow there was love there for me? I cannot say.

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Posted by on February 10, 2011 in Bedwell, Cemeteries, Curbow, Lytle

 

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Belle Sarah Lytle – Daughter of Lucinda Curbow and William Henry Lytle

Lucinda and William had one daughter that survived to her old age – Belle Sarah Lytle – who was born in Waco, McLennan County, Texas on 17 Jul 1879.  Belle Sarah Lytle never married.  In various census records and Waco city directories she is listed as “telephone operator,” “stenographer for railroad,” and on her Texas Death Certificate it lists her occupation as a “Stenographer-Clerk” for M.K. & T Railroad.”  

Her grand nephew, Marvin Matha Booker, Jr. remembers her this way:  When we went to Waco for a visit, Miss Belle {Belle Sarah Lytle} usually had Sunday dinner with all of us either at the farm or in downtown Waco.  She was a quiet lady allowing others to carry the conversation.  I remember her mostly talking about her church.

It appears that Belle Sarah Lytle spent all but the last six months of her life living in Waco, Texas.  Belle Sarah Lytle died in Katy Employee Hospital in Denison, Grayson County, Texas on 5 May 1963.  She was 83 years old.  She is laid to rest in the Lytle family plot in Greenwood Cemetery (East Waco Cemetery). 

Belle Sarah Lytle - Greenwood Cemtery, Waco, McLennen County, Texas

WACO TIME HERALD, PAGE 17, MONDAY, MAY 6, 1963: Lytle, Miss Belle – Miss Belle Lytle of 1900 Webster Avenue died at 9:00 a.m., Sunday in a Denison hospital. Funeral services will be at 11:00 a.m. Tuesday in Wilkerson and Hatch Chapel. Chaplain Charles D. Harris and Rev. Urban Schultze officiating. Burial at Greenwood Cemetery. She has no survivors. Wilkerson and Hatch Funeral Home, 1124 Washington Ave.

 

 
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Posted by on January 22, 2011 in Lytle

 

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William Henry Lytle – Husband of Lucinda Curbow

Lucinda Curbow’s husband, William Henry Lytle, was born in Georgia in September of 1840.  I do not know who the parents of William Henry Lytle were or exactly where in Georgia he was born.  When he enlisted into the Confederate Army, he did so out of Macon County.  

Macon County, Georgia

In the 1850 census there is present in Macon County the family of William and Mary Lytle – they have a son named William and a daughter named Sarah.  (William Henry Lytle and his wife would later name their daughter Belle Sarah.)  This could very well be his family, but at this time I have nothing to tie them together. 

William Lytle enlisted into the Confederate States Army at the age of 20 out of Macon County, Georgia on June 15, 1861.  His rank was private at enlistment and he was a sergeant at discharge.  He was a member of Company C, 12th Georgia Infantry Regiment, Dole’s Brigade, Rhodes Division, J. T. Jackson’s Army Corps.  William was wounded in the arm during the Battle of Lynchburg (Virginia) and spent time in the CSA General Hospital in Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Muster Roll Card - William Henry Lytle

He was later captured and taken prisoner in 1864 at Winchester, Virginia and transported (via Harper’s Ferry) to the dreaded Yankee prison camp at Point Lookout, Maryland. 

Prisoner of War Muster Card - William Henry Lytle

Point Lookout was a prison camp for Confederate prisoners of war built on the tip of the peninsula where the Potomac River joins Chesapeake Bay.   Point Lookout, Maryland was deemed to be the largest and worst Yankee POW camp.  It was constructed of fourteen foot high wooden walls.  These walls surrounded an area of about 40 acres.  A walkway surrounded the top of the walls where Negro guards walked day and night.  It is reported that the guards were brutal in their treatment of the prisoners.  No barracks were ever built.  The Confederate soldiers were given tents to sleep in until overcrowding became so bad there were not even enough tents to go around.  Prison capacity was 10,000, but at any given time there would be between 12,000 to 20,000 soldiers incarcerated there.  The extreme overcrowding, Maryland’s freezing temperatures, shortages of firewood for heat, and living in tents took its toll and many lives were lost due to exposure.  As the water supply became polluted and food rations ran low, prisoners died from disease and starvation.  Food was in short supply; the men were reported to hunt rats as a food source.  A prisoner, Rev. J. B. Traywick said, “Our suffering from hunger was indescribable.”  (http://www.clements.umich.edu/Webguides/Schoff/NP/Point.html)

Point Lookout, Maryland - Yankee Prison Camp - Image from mycivilwar.com

William Henry Lytle survived this prison camp and was “exchanged” at the end of the war in 1865 – when he presumably headed for Texas.  As previously mentioned, William met and married Lucinda in Waco – they married 20 Aug. 1878.   Based on census and tax records, William and Lucinda spent their lives in Waco, Texas. 

 On 21 Nov. 1892, William Lytle joined the Pat Cleburne Camp of Ex-Confederate Army Veterans:  WACO MORNING NEWS; Sunday, April 21, 1895: The Pat Cleburne Camp was organized in 1888. Roster and roll of members as of March 31, 1895, full name, rank and organization:  Lytle, W. H. Ord Sgt. Co. C 12 Georgia Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia.

Cleburne Camp Application - William Henry Lytle

William died at his home on 25 Oct 1905.  He was 65 years old.  He is laid to rest in Greenwood Cemetery, also known as – East Waco Cemetery in the Lytle family plot.  Lucinda, his wife, and his children, Belle Sarah and William, Jr. are buried there with him.

William Henry Lytle - Death Notice

I would be interested in hearing from any Lytle researchers who have information on William Henry Lytle and his parents. 

 
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Posted by on January 15, 2011 in Brick Walls, Civil War, Lytle

 

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Lucinda Curbow Lytle

Lucinda Curbow Lytle (my husband’s great-great grand aunt) was the first child born to Tilman P. Curbow and Elizabeth Box (18 Dec, 1843 in Georgia).  Lucinda was known to her family and friends as “Lucy.”  Lucy spent a good part of her childhood living in Itawamba County, Mississippi before coming to Texas with her family during the Civil War period. 

On August 20, 1878 Lucinda married William Henry Lytle, a Confederate Civil War veteran, in McLennan County, Texas.  Given the time period – she married late in life – at the age of 34 (her groom was 37 years old).  When I reflect upon the life of Lucinda Curbow, I very often envision her as the family caretaker.  Given that she was the oldest daughter, I think that it is entirely possible that Lucinda may have set aside her own desires for a family – and that she married later in life, because she knew that she was needed by her father to assist in running the household and taking care of her younger siblings after the death of their mother, Elizabeth.  In fact, her youngest brother, Henry Harrison Curbow, is still living with Lucy and her new husband in the 1880 census. 

It is fairly clear, based on census records, McLennan County Tax Rolls and Waco City Directories that Lucinda and her husband spent their entire married lives living together in Waco, Texas.  They had four children, but it appears that only two of them survived to adulthood, Belle Sarah and William Henry Lytle, Jr.   The family home was located east of downtown Waco on Clay Avenue.  According to a local historian that my husband and I met at the McLennan County courthouse, this location used to be a very charming Victorian section of town.  Sadly it has fallen into neglect and disrepair. 

Lytle Family Home – Clay Avenue – Waco, McLennan County, Texas

Lucinda’s husband, William Henry Lytle, died many years before she did – in 1905.  After his death, Lucinda can be found always living with her children, Belle and Edward, Jr.  In 1915, Lucy filed a Widow’s Pension Application based on her husband’s Civil War Service where the Judge describes her as, “an old lady whose mind is very feeble.” 

Lucy died 16 July, 1923 in Waco, McLennan County, Texas.  She was 80 years, 5 months and 2 days old when she died of kidney failure.

Published on MONDAY, JULY 16, 1923 in the WACO TIMES HERALD

Lucinda Curbow Lytle - Obituary

 

Lucinda is laid to rest in the Lytle family plot in Greenwood Cemetery, Waco, McLennan County, Texas.

Lytle Family Headstone/Plot - Greenwood Cemetery, Waco, McLennan County, Texas

 
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Posted by on January 2, 2011 in Lytle

 

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