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Tag Archives: Georgia

Edward Henry Pressley – Husband of Martha Isabell Curbow

Edward Henry Pressley was a son of Enoch B. Pressley and Mary E. Barrington, born 3 November, 1845 in Cartersville, Bartow County, Georgia.  (Edward Henry Pressley’s Texas Death Certificate states that he was born in Edgefield County, South Carolina; however, his Civil War service records indicate that he was born in Bartow County, Georgia.  Additionally, the book entitled, History of Texas Together With a Biographical History, confirms that he was born in Cartersville, Barstow County, Georgia.  However, this same book also contradicts his year of birth stating that he was born in 1843 – not 1845 as per his Texas Death Certificate.) 

Edward Henry Pressley – from the collection of Carol Kay Morrison Wolfe

Edward served the Confederacy in the Civil War.  He enlisted in Bartow County, Georgia in March of 1861 as a private and was later promoted to full Corporal.  He was a member of Co. H – 60th Georgia Infantry.  Edward lost a portion of his left hand when he was shot by a mini-ball.  Edward was captured in Virginia and taken prisoner and was present on the day of surrender at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia on 9 April 1865.  

Confederate Muster Roll Card

After the war, on 5 May 1868 Edward Pressley married Sarah “Sallie” T. McKie in Oxford, Lafayette County, Mississippi.  Sarah McKie was a daughter of a Mississippi planter.  Sarah graduated from the University of Mississippi at Oxford. The couple had one son, Edward Ward Tupper Pressley born in 1869.  By 1880 the family was in Texas – Hamilton County.  Sallie died there in about 1880-81. 

Sallie McKie – Photo is from the collection of Carol Kay Morrison Wolfe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On September 1, 1884, Edward married Martha Isabell Curbow Hodges Bedwell in McLennan County, Texas.  Edward and Belle had two children:  Jennie May in 1889 and Walter Gordon in 1891.  Nothing much is known about either of these two children.  I would like to be in touch with anyone that has any information on them.  

According to the book entitled, History of Texas – Together with a Biographical History (page 635), Edward and Belle are living in Hillsboro, Hill County, Texas in 1895 where Edward is a “merchant.”  

In the 1900 census the family is in Cleburne, Johnson County, Texas where the family is indexed as “hotel keepers.”

By 1908 Edward and Bell are in San Antonio.  There I find them in various city directories and census records for the remainder of their lives.  

Edward died at the age of 81 on 31 Jul 1927 in San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas.  He is laid to rest near his wife in Mission Burial Park. 

OBITUARY:  Published San Antonio Express, Monday, 1 Aug 1927, Page 11:  PRESSLEY – Edward Henry Pressley, aged 81 years, died at his residence, 134 Beldon Avenue, at an early hour Sunday morning.  Besides his widow, Mrs. Belle Pressley, he is survived by his daughter, Mrs. C. T. Harper and his son, W. G. Pressley, all of San Antonio.  Funeral services will be held from the Porter Loring Chapel, Monday, Aug 2nd at 4 o’clock.  Dr. A. E. Rector of Harlandale Methodist Church. 

Edward Henry Pressley with wife Martha Isabell Curbow – Photo from collection of Carol Kay Morrison Wolfe
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Posted by on March 5, 2011 in Curbow, Pressley

 

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Jesse Richardson Grantham

Jesse Richardson Grantham was my husband’s 3rd great grandfather.  According to what is inscribed on his tombstone he was born 6 Jan 1834 in Harris, Union County, Georgia.  Many of my husband’s ancestors migrated from the north Georgia area to Texas.  This is also the case for Jesse Grantham.  Union County lies in far north Georgia bordering North Carolina.  Jesse was the youngest son of William M. Grantham (1783-1863) and Susannah Richardson (1800-1873). 

Jesse Richardson Grantham; Photo is courtesy of Tina Nored Kasiske

At the tender age of 17 – Jesse Richardson Grantham married Susan Adeline Parks (1833-1924) on May 11, 1851 in Union County Georgia.  The couple raised a very large family:  Monroe Mathias born in 1852; Hillard Cisero born in 1854; Benjamin Franklin born in 1857; Rufus Marion born in 1859; Ira Foster born in 1861; Alice E. born in 1865; Emma Leticia born in 1867; Ada Elizabeth born in 1871; and Mary Etta born in 1876.  

Jesse Richardson Grantham and wife Susan Adeline Parks - Photo courtesy of Linda Cheesman

 

By 1870 the family has left their north Georgia home and has relocated to Burlingame, Osage County, Kansas.  Osage County is in the eastern portion of the State near Topeka.  It is unknown to me why the Grantham family moved to Kansas.  Burlingame – which was originally established as Council City – was an important stop on the Santa Fe trail. 

The next thirty years of Jesse Richardson Grantham’s life are a mystery to me.  I cannot find him in any census record until 1900 when he is 66 years old living with wife Susannah in Erath County, Texas.  In every census period he lists himself as a farmer.  Susannah states that she had given birth to nine children and that eight are living.  (Alice E. Grantham died as an infant.) 

 Again, according to his headstone, Jesse Richardson Grantham died 3 Sept, 1903.  Family members say that he died in Stephenville, Erath County, Texas.  He is laid to rest in Live Oak Cemetery, Dublin, Erath County, Texas.

 

Jesse Richardson Grantham – Live Oak Cemebery; Dublin, Erath County, Texas

*Please note – there are various researchers that have various dates of birth and death for Jesse.  For our purposes – the only source I have are the dates on his headstone.

 
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Posted by on January 26, 2011 in Grantham

 

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William Henry Lytle – Husband of Lucinda Curbow

Lucinda Curbow’s husband, William Henry Lytle, was born in Georgia in September of 1840.  I do not know who the parents of William Henry Lytle were or exactly where in Georgia he was born.  When he enlisted into the Confederate Army, he did so out of Macon County.  

Macon County, Georgia

In the 1850 census there is present in Macon County the family of William and Mary Lytle – they have a son named William and a daughter named Sarah.  (William Henry Lytle and his wife would later name their daughter Belle Sarah.)  This could very well be his family, but at this time I have nothing to tie them together. 

William Lytle enlisted into the Confederate States Army at the age of 20 out of Macon County, Georgia on June 15, 1861.  His rank was private at enlistment and he was a sergeant at discharge.  He was a member of Company C, 12th Georgia Infantry Regiment, Dole’s Brigade, Rhodes Division, J. T. Jackson’s Army Corps.  William was wounded in the arm during the Battle of Lynchburg (Virginia) and spent time in the CSA General Hospital in Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Muster Roll Card - William Henry Lytle

He was later captured and taken prisoner in 1864 at Winchester, Virginia and transported (via Harper’s Ferry) to the dreaded Yankee prison camp at Point Lookout, Maryland. 

Prisoner of War Muster Card - William Henry Lytle

Point Lookout was a prison camp for Confederate prisoners of war built on the tip of the peninsula where the Potomac River joins Chesapeake Bay.   Point Lookout, Maryland was deemed to be the largest and worst Yankee POW camp.  It was constructed of fourteen foot high wooden walls.  These walls surrounded an area of about 40 acres.  A walkway surrounded the top of the walls where Negro guards walked day and night.  It is reported that the guards were brutal in their treatment of the prisoners.  No barracks were ever built.  The Confederate soldiers were given tents to sleep in until overcrowding became so bad there were not even enough tents to go around.  Prison capacity was 10,000, but at any given time there would be between 12,000 to 20,000 soldiers incarcerated there.  The extreme overcrowding, Maryland’s freezing temperatures, shortages of firewood for heat, and living in tents took its toll and many lives were lost due to exposure.  As the water supply became polluted and food rations ran low, prisoners died from disease and starvation.  Food was in short supply; the men were reported to hunt rats as a food source.  A prisoner, Rev. J. B. Traywick said, “Our suffering from hunger was indescribable.”  (http://www.clements.umich.edu/Webguides/Schoff/NP/Point.html)

Point Lookout, Maryland - Yankee Prison Camp - Image from mycivilwar.com

William Henry Lytle survived this prison camp and was “exchanged” at the end of the war in 1865 – when he presumably headed for Texas.  As previously mentioned, William met and married Lucinda in Waco – they married 20 Aug. 1878.   Based on census and tax records, William and Lucinda spent their lives in Waco, Texas. 

 On 21 Nov. 1892, William Lytle joined the Pat Cleburne Camp of Ex-Confederate Army Veterans:  WACO MORNING NEWS; Sunday, April 21, 1895: The Pat Cleburne Camp was organized in 1888. Roster and roll of members as of March 31, 1895, full name, rank and organization:  Lytle, W. H. Ord Sgt. Co. C 12 Georgia Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia.

Cleburne Camp Application - William Henry Lytle

William died at his home on 25 Oct 1905.  He was 65 years old.  He is laid to rest in Greenwood Cemetery, also known as – East Waco Cemetery in the Lytle family plot.  Lucinda, his wife, and his children, Belle Sarah and William, Jr. are buried there with him.

William Henry Lytle - Death Notice

I would be interested in hearing from any Lytle researchers who have information on William Henry Lytle and his parents. 

 
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Posted by on January 15, 2011 in Brick Walls, Civil War, Lytle

 

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Tilman P. Curbow – Southern Patriot

Tilman P. Curbow is the great-great-great-great grandfather of my son.  Tilman Curbow migrated across the south and brought the Curbow family to Texas.  Because of Tilman’s adventurous spirit, my son can today say proudly, “I am a seventh generation Texan.”   Tilman fought a war; suffered many hardships; lived a rough and tumble life; and left a trail that was often difficult to follow.  The bits and pieces and details of his life were buried by time and only recently were they uncovered and put in written form.  Tilman’s life tells the story of hard work, determination and real grit, and perhaps a barroom brawl or two (seriously) !  

There are many unanswered questions about Tilman Curbow.  We know that he was born around 1821 in Georgia and that he died in Texas somewhere around 1900.  I believe that Tilman was the son of Henry Curbow (who died in Cass County, Texas in 1850).  Additionally, I believe that Tilman is a younger brother of Wiseman Curbow who settled in Bowie County, Texas.  Tilman was married to Elizabeth Box, the daughter of William Bolton Box.  Their two oldest children Lucinda and Oliver Perry were born in Georgia.   The rest of their children (Virginia Elizabeth, Harriet, William F., Martha Isabell and Henry Harrison) were born in Mississippi, most likely Itawamba County.

Tilman Curbow served the Confederacy in the Amercian Civil War – first with the Arkansas 6th Infantry Regiment where he participated in the Battle of Shiloh and later in Texas with Nelson’s Co., 2 Battalion Cavalry.

Tilman Curbow - Civil War Muster Roll - Bowie County, Texas - Feb 3, 1864

During the reconstruction period Tilman Curbow was in Bowie County where he served as a juror on the infamous Dalby murder trial.  

Around 1867 Tilman moved his family to McLennan County – east of Waco on the Brazos River – where he farmed and ranched.   Tilman lost his wife sometime between 1870 and 1880.   Toward the end of his life Tilman became involved in a lawsuit over probate/property rights which case went all the way to the Texas Supreme Court. In connection with this lawsuit a “Suggestion of Death” for Tilman Curbow was filed on March, 1902.  

These are the last known records that Tilman Curbow left us.  It is my hope that as I progress in the research – I will be able to shed more light on some of our unanswered questions about him.  While we do not know everything about Tilman – we do know without a doubt that he possessed a strong pioneering spirit – that he experienced hardships – and that he was a true southern patriot.  His humble life is remembered here with fondness and appreciation.

 
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Posted by on January 1, 2011 in Brick Walls, Curbow

 

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