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James Turner Miller – A Good Man Killed – Murder Most Foul

As so correctly stated by Aaron Holt of the National Archives and Records Administration, “It only takes three generations to lose a piece of oral family history.  If you want to avoid losing those precious family stories passed down through the generations, the story must be purposely and accurately repeated over and over again through the generations to be preserved.”

As it pertains to oral family histories – the Miller family has done a great job – specifically as it relates to James Turner Miller, the father of Elijah Spencer Miller (whose wife was Harriet Curbow).  When I began researching the life of Elijah and Hattie – I naturally poked around for information on Elijah’s father, and through census records, I believed that to be James Turner Miller, who lived “east of the Brazos – near Waco, Texas.  As I worked with other Miller researchers, I was told on more than one occasion that Mr. Miller was a wealthy landowner, had been in Waco on a supply trip on the day of his death, and that he had been murdered by cattle rustlers on his way home.  I put that in my “to be determined file” and moved on with the research.  Thankfully, I have many fantastic research partners – and Mr. Tom Hedges (a Miller descendant) – was able to locate this news article, presumably published in a Waco newspaper the day after the murder on 19 Aug 1873.

A GOOD MAN KILLED – MURDER MOST FOUL

Intelligence was yesterday morning received of the death by gunshot the evening before, of James T. Miller, a resident of this county, and one of the most orderly and respectable citizens. Who it was that committed this atrocious crime, or by what spirit of diabolism actuated, is yet one of the undeveloped mysteries. Certain it is, however, it was a murder most foul. Jim Miller, for so he was familiarly called, was in town the day he was killed, and it is known that he was not armed. He fell, therefore, by the hand of the assassin. He had bought during the day supplies and a quantity of lumber for use on his place, and was on his way home with them. He lived at the Pitts place, on the Corsicana road, twelve miles from town. A short distance this side of town, night coming on, Mr. Miller, being on horseback, left the wagons on the main road and started home on the “trail,” a more direct route. Shortly afterward the report of a gun was heard in that direction; Mr. Miller not coming home, search was instituted, and on the following morning (yesterday) his body was found. He was shot at the trail crossing of that ill-famed creek, the Tehuacana, a short distance above the Corsicana Road.  A load of buckshot, some eighteen or twenty, taking effect in his side, had done its bloody work and there he lay. “Dead men tell no tales,” and in the absence of witnesses it is possible that the perpetrator of this great crime may go unwhipped of justice and unrecognized, save by the eye of heaven, as the murderer he is. But if it is possible, under such circumstances and in the absence of any clue, to ascertain who it was that did the deed, this should be done and the guilty party be awarded at the hands of the law the fearful penalty due his crime. The deceased will be buried with Masonic honors by Waco Lodge No. 92, to-day.

As it turned out – the family oral history was spot on about the facts of Jim Miller’s murder.

James Turner Miller – known as Jim – was born to Alfred Miller (b. 1793) and Sarah Wray on 12 Feb 1824 in South Carolina.

At the time of the 1850 census we find James T. Miller living next door to his father in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi.  He is a blacksmith – both he and his father are land and slave owners.  Jim is living with his first wife Rebecca, age 21 (Rebecca Ann Anderson) and son Elizah, age 2; (Elijah Spencer Miller, born 1849).  Also next door is Rebecca Anderson, Elijah Anderson and James Anderson.  Can we presume this to be the family of Rebecca, Elijah Miller’s wife?

Miller researcher Shirley McAnelly Hill states that Jim Miller and family were in Texas by 1858 – and they can indeed be found in the 1860 census living in McLennan County, Texas.  He is with his wife Rebecca and son Spencer and daughter Nancy (Nancy Roseann Miller, born 1859).

The oral family story continues stating that Rebecca died in childbirth while Jim was in Galveston, Texas serving in the Civil War sometime around 1862.  As it turns out, this part of the family story checks out as well – Jim did serve in Confederate Army with the 9th Militia Dist., McLennan County, 28th Brigade, Texas Militia – where he held the rank of 3rd Sgt.  It could be that the child Rebecca gave birth to was daughter Mary Alice Miller (born 1862).

Muster Roll Index Card – James Turner Miller

Jim Miller married for a second time to Catherine S. Young on 9 Dec 1864 (presume in McLennan County – although I have not located a marriage record for them there).  The couple had five children:  William Turner Miller in 1865; Susan Ellanora Miller in 1867; Rebecca Miller in 1869; Permelia Paralee Miller in 1871; and Jesse Perkins Miller in 1873).  When the census was taken in 1870, the family is still living in McLennan County, Texas “east of the Brazos.”  At that time Jim owned real estate valued at $8,500 and personal property valued at $2,000.

On a recent genealogy trip to Waco, my husband and I spent hour upon hour, looking through old Wills and probate papers at the McLennan County District Clerk’s office.  While there I pulled the Will and probate file of James Turner Miller – and it was voluminous!  The probate file settles James Turner Miller’s family relationships and confirms that he was a very well to do citizen of McLennan County, Texas.  Since the file was so large, I did not copy it in its entirely; however, I did have a few pertinent pages copied – and will write about that in my next post.  Stay tuned.

 

 

 
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Posted by on June 21, 2017 in Miller

 

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Edward Henry Pressley – Husband of Martha Isabell Curbow

Edward Henry Pressley was a son of Enoch B. Pressley and Mary E. Barrington, born 3 November, 1845 in Cartersville, Bartow County, Georgia.  (Edward Henry Pressley’s Texas Death Certificate states that he was born in Edgefield County, South Carolina; however, his Civil War service records indicate that he was born in Bartow County, Georgia.  Additionally, the book entitled, History of Texas Together With a Biographical History, confirms that he was born in Cartersville, Barstow County, Georgia.  However, this same book also contradicts his year of birth stating that he was born in 1843 – not 1845 as per his Texas Death Certificate.) 

Edward Henry Pressley – from the collection of Carol Kay Morrison Wolfe

Edward served the Confederacy in the Civil War.  He enlisted in Bartow County, Georgia in March of 1861 as a private and was later promoted to full Corporal.  He was a member of Co. H – 60th Georgia Infantry.  Edward lost a portion of his left hand when he was shot by a mini-ball.  Edward was captured in Virginia and taken prisoner and was present on the day of surrender at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia on 9 April 1865.  

Confederate Muster Roll Card

After the war, on 5 May 1868 Edward Pressley married Sarah “Sallie” T. McKie in Oxford, Lafayette County, Mississippi.  Sarah McKie was a daughter of a Mississippi planter.  Sarah graduated from the University of Mississippi at Oxford. The couple had one son, Edward Ward Tupper Pressley born in 1869.  By 1880 the family was in Texas – Hamilton County.  Sallie died there in about 1880-81. 

Sallie McKie – Photo is from the collection of Carol Kay Morrison Wolfe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On September 1, 1884, Edward married Martha Isabell Curbow Hodges Bedwell in McLennan County, Texas.  Edward and Belle had two children:  Jennie May in 1889 and Walter Gordon in 1891.  Nothing much is known about either of these two children.  I would like to be in touch with anyone that has any information on them.  

According to the book entitled, History of Texas – Together with a Biographical History (page 635), Edward and Belle are living in Hillsboro, Hill County, Texas in 1895 where Edward is a “merchant.”  

In the 1900 census the family is in Cleburne, Johnson County, Texas where the family is indexed as “hotel keepers.”

By 1908 Edward and Bell are in San Antonio.  There I find them in various city directories and census records for the remainder of their lives.  

Edward died at the age of 81 on 31 Jul 1927 in San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas.  He is laid to rest near his wife in Mission Burial Park. 

OBITUARY:  Published San Antonio Express, Monday, 1 Aug 1927, Page 11:  PRESSLEY – Edward Henry Pressley, aged 81 years, died at his residence, 134 Beldon Avenue, at an early hour Sunday morning.  Besides his widow, Mrs. Belle Pressley, he is survived by his daughter, Mrs. C. T. Harper and his son, W. G. Pressley, all of San Antonio.  Funeral services will be held from the Porter Loring Chapel, Monday, Aug 2nd at 4 o’clock.  Dr. A. E. Rector of Harlandale Methodist Church. 

Edward Henry Pressley with wife Martha Isabell Curbow – Photo from collection of Carol Kay Morrison Wolfe
 
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Posted by on March 5, 2011 in Curbow, Pressley

 

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Joanna Elizabeth Ham

Joanna Elizabeth “Jo” Ham was the first daughter born to Joel Ham and his wife Mary Emily Montgomery.  She was born in Mississippi, probably in Yalobusha County, on 31 Aug. 1843.  Joanna can be found there with her parents in the 1850 census.  By 1860, the Ham family is in Texas, and we find Joanna there with them in Mount Vernon, Titus County.  There she grew up and met Benjamin Franklin (known as Bing) Edwards whom she married on 3 Jan 1862 in Hopkins County, Texas.     

Bing was born in 28 September of 1840 in Cherokee County, Alabama.  He is one of the sons of Gideon  and Jane Edwards.  Bing served the Confederacy in the Civil War.  He was a Sergeant in Company K, 19th Texas Infantry.  His tombstone states that he was a “Badge of Courage” recipient. 

The family spent time between several different counties in Texas – 1870 they were in Hopkins County; 1880 they were in Johnson County; and in 1900 they were in Hill County.

To say that Jo and Bing had a large family would be a huge understatement.  In the census records Joanna advised the census taker that she had given birth 14 times and that 11 children survived.  Now…I don’t know about you – I barely managed to bring forth one child.  Can you image what it was like to be pregnant 14 times?!  And to give birth 14 times?!  And all this without prenatal care?  And then to lose three children – what heart-break. 

 These are the children that we know about:

  1. Calidonnia “Donnie” Mansfield Edwards (1864-1939)
  2. Alice Lenorah Edwards (1866-1946)
  3. Mary Udora Edwards (1868-1943)
  4. Sara Edwards (1871-?)
  5. Joanna Elizabeth “Betty” Edwards (1872-1930)
  6. Ninnie M. Edwards (1875-?)
  7. Benjamin Franklin Edwards, Jr. (1877-?)
  8. Lula L. Edwards (1879-?)
  9. William Arthur Edwards (1880-1898)
  10. Robert Eston Edwards (1882-1974)
  11. Ola Etna Edwards (1885-1971)
  12. Thomas E. Edwards (1886-1950)

Joanna’s husband, Benjamin Franklin Edwards died in Hill County, Texas on 4 July 1910 at the age of 69.  He is laid to rest in Derden Cemetery in the county.  That same year in the census record Joanna is living with one of her daughters, Ola Etna Edwards Mabe and her husband Clarence.  Joanna died five years later at the age of 72 on 20 Sept 1915 in Buel, Johnson County, Texas.  She is laid to rest in the Buel Cemetery.  Her death certificate below is a rare find.  Even though death records were sometimes kept as early as 1900 in Texas – it is unusual to find one this early (1915).  

Joanna Elizabeth Ham Edwards - Texas Death Certificate

This branch of the Ham family tree frankly still needs a lot of work.  We don’t have much information on any of Joanna’s children and no photographs.  For those of you that know me – you know I love the old family photographs most of all.  It helps to put a face to a name when researching a family line.  Theoretically, there should be a lot of descendants out there!  We would love to hear from any of you that are interested in exchanging information on the Ham family genealogy.  

 
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Posted by on February 21, 2011 in Civil War, Edwards, Ham

 

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William Henry Lytle – Husband of Lucinda Curbow

Lucinda Curbow’s husband, William Henry Lytle, was born in Georgia in September of 1840.  I do not know who the parents of William Henry Lytle were or exactly where in Georgia he was born.  When he enlisted into the Confederate Army, he did so out of Macon County.  

Macon County, Georgia

In the 1850 census there is present in Macon County the family of William and Mary Lytle – they have a son named William and a daughter named Sarah.  (William Henry Lytle and his wife would later name their daughter Belle Sarah.)  This could very well be his family, but at this time I have nothing to tie them together. 

William Lytle enlisted into the Confederate States Army at the age of 20 out of Macon County, Georgia on June 15, 1861.  His rank was private at enlistment and he was a sergeant at discharge.  He was a member of Company C, 12th Georgia Infantry Regiment, Dole’s Brigade, Rhodes Division, J. T. Jackson’s Army Corps.  William was wounded in the arm during the Battle of Lynchburg (Virginia) and spent time in the CSA General Hospital in Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Muster Roll Card - William Henry Lytle

He was later captured and taken prisoner in 1864 at Winchester, Virginia and transported (via Harper’s Ferry) to the dreaded Yankee prison camp at Point Lookout, Maryland. 

Prisoner of War Muster Card - William Henry Lytle

Point Lookout was a prison camp for Confederate prisoners of war built on the tip of the peninsula where the Potomac River joins Chesapeake Bay.   Point Lookout, Maryland was deemed to be the largest and worst Yankee POW camp.  It was constructed of fourteen foot high wooden walls.  These walls surrounded an area of about 40 acres.  A walkway surrounded the top of the walls where Negro guards walked day and night.  It is reported that the guards were brutal in their treatment of the prisoners.  No barracks were ever built.  The Confederate soldiers were given tents to sleep in until overcrowding became so bad there were not even enough tents to go around.  Prison capacity was 10,000, but at any given time there would be between 12,000 to 20,000 soldiers incarcerated there.  The extreme overcrowding, Maryland’s freezing temperatures, shortages of firewood for heat, and living in tents took its toll and many lives were lost due to exposure.  As the water supply became polluted and food rations ran low, prisoners died from disease and starvation.  Food was in short supply; the men were reported to hunt rats as a food source.  A prisoner, Rev. J. B. Traywick said, “Our suffering from hunger was indescribable.”  (http://www.clements.umich.edu/Webguides/Schoff/NP/Point.html)

Point Lookout, Maryland - Yankee Prison Camp - Image from mycivilwar.com

William Henry Lytle survived this prison camp and was “exchanged” at the end of the war in 1865 – when he presumably headed for Texas.  As previously mentioned, William met and married Lucinda in Waco – they married 20 Aug. 1878.   Based on census and tax records, William and Lucinda spent their lives in Waco, Texas. 

 On 21 Nov. 1892, William Lytle joined the Pat Cleburne Camp of Ex-Confederate Army Veterans:  WACO MORNING NEWS; Sunday, April 21, 1895: The Pat Cleburne Camp was organized in 1888. Roster and roll of members as of March 31, 1895, full name, rank and organization:  Lytle, W. H. Ord Sgt. Co. C 12 Georgia Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia.

Cleburne Camp Application - William Henry Lytle

William died at his home on 25 Oct 1905.  He was 65 years old.  He is laid to rest in Greenwood Cemetery, also known as – East Waco Cemetery in the Lytle family plot.  Lucinda, his wife, and his children, Belle Sarah and William, Jr. are buried there with him.

William Henry Lytle - Death Notice

I would be interested in hearing from any Lytle researchers who have information on William Henry Lytle and his parents. 

 
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Posted by on January 15, 2011 in Brick Walls, Civil War, Lytle

 

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Hiram Jethro “Jet” Seago

The Seago family has a long and interesting history, both in Europe and here in the United States.  Unfortunately,  we don’t have much information on our Seago ancestors.  Oral tradition has the Seago family coming from Alsace, Lorraine, France/Germany.  The Seago family has an annual reunion and recently they met in Seagoville, Texas.  Seagoville was founded by Tillman Kimsey Seago.  The oldest known Seago is John Seago born 1715 who married Margaret Birmingham at St. Luke’s Parish in Church Hill, Queen Anne’s County, Maryland, in 1740.  Interestingly enough, St. Luke’s Parish is the same church where Jean Corbo (Curbow) married Ann Phillips in 1755.   
Seago Family Crest

Hiram Jethro “Jet” Seago is my husband’s 3rd great grandfather through his daughter Sallie Mae Seago  → Ida Bell Howard who married Charles Franklin Curbow (great grandfather to my husband).  More names and relationships to untangle !  Hiram was the son of Joseph Seago and Amanda White.  It is believed that they died young leaving him an orphan.  It appears that his grandparents (James and Sally Seago) raised him.  

On 9 March 1853 Hiram married Nancy Jane Strunk (probably in Whitley County, Kentucky).  The couple had six children:  Mary Elizabeth in 1854; Sarah (Sallie) Mae in 1857; Nancy Jane in 1859; Ambrose Crawford in 1861; John William in 1865; and James Martin in 1868.

Hiram Jet Seago – Muster Card

Hiram served the Union during the Civil War.  According to his muster roll cards, he was a member of Company E, 32nd Kentucky Infantry.  On 7 January, 1863 Hiram Jethro Seago enlisted into the Union Army in Whitley County, Kentucky.  His rank at enlistment was private.  He was mustered out of the Army on 12 Aug 1863.  The note on his muster card reads as follows: “Deserted 11 Jun 1863 at Somerset, Kentucky.” His file contains a letter from the Adjutant General’s Office at the War Department dated 18 Nov. 1887 which discharges Hiram of the charge of desertion. It contains no details as to why he was accused and subsequently discharged of this crime.

 

It is not known when his first wife, Nancy Jane Strunk died.

On 15 Jun 1899 he married Mary Jane Abel.  He lived out the rest of his life with her and died 12 Apr 1919 in Brownsville, Edmonson County, Kentucky.  

Hiram Jethro Seago – Death Certificate – Photo courtesy of Sherman Gibbs

He is laid to rest at Good Spring Baptist Church and Cemetery  – which is an historic church and cemetery within Mammoth Cave National Park in Kentucky.

I would love to hear from other researchers that may have information on Jet Seago. 

 
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Posted by on January 15, 2011 in Brick Walls, Civil War, Seago

 

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Tilman P. Curbow – Civil War Soldier

BG (“before genealogy”) the only thing I really knew about the Civil War was what I had learned in American history class and by watching Gone with the Wind!  Never would I have dreamed that so many of my husband’s ancestors were Confederate Civil War soldiers.  One such soldier was Tilman P. Curbow, my husband’s ggg-grandfather. 

Brother against Brother

“Blue against Gray – Brother against Brother!” Credit: AOL Images

These were turbulent and difficult times to be a Southerner.  I often reflect on the burden placed upon Elizabeth, Tilman’s wife, as she saw her husband leave for war.  Upon her fell the duty of managing the household and the raising of the children.  Keep in mind that at this time in history, “a lady” was not to leave the house without a gentleman escort; could not sign a contract on her own behalf; and could not vote.  During the Civil War period, women out of sheer necessity picked up tools and harnesses that their men had laid aside.  The southern home front during the Civil War was a place of severe hardship and heartache. 

Perhaps sensing the impending doom, sometime around 1858, Tilman Curbow and family left their Mississippi home and relocated to Carouse, Ouachita County, Arkansas.  

Map of Arkansas highlighting Ouachita County

On April 12, 1861, the first shots were fired in the American Civil War.  The State of Arkansas was a part of the Confederate States of America during the Civil War, and provided a source of troops, supplies, military and political leaders for the Confederacy.  One year after the 1860 census was taken, and three months after the start of the Civil War, on July 19, 1861, Tilman Curbow enlisted into the Confederate States Army.  He is indexed as follows:  CURBOW, T.P. Pvt – Enlisted 19 July 1861 at Arkadelphia, Arkansas; Discharged 6 July 1862 at Tupelo, Mississippi; Age 42, farmer, ht 5’ 10 ½”, eyes gray, hair light, complexion light. 

I do not know where Tilman’s family is located during this time period.  It may be that Elizabeth and the children stayed in Ouachita County, Arkansas.  Alternatively, it is possible that Elizabeth and children returned to Itawamba County, Mississippi to wait out the war with her father William Bolton Box.  The more likely scenario, however, is that Tilman has taken them to live with his brother, Wiseman Curbow, in Bowie County, Texas. 

Tilman was a member of the 6th Arkansas Infantry.  This Infantry Regiment was formed at Little Rock, Arkansas in June of 1861 with 604 men.  Its companies were recruited in Little Rock and the counties of Calhoun, Dallas, Ouachita, Arkansas, Lafayette and Union. 

Tilman P. Curbow – Muster Roll – Arkansas

After its organization, Tilman’s regiment marched overland to Pocahontas, Arkansas (which is located in Randolph County).  Remembering that Tilman was living in Carouse and enlisted in Arkadelphia, this could have been close to a 250 mile walk for him.  Measles broke out in camp, and a great many died there. 

In September of 1861, the regiment was transferred to Confederate service in the brigade (consisting of the 2nd, 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th Arkansas Infantry regiments) commanded by Brigadier General William J. Hardee.  After a raid into Missouri, the 6th Arkansas returned to camp at Pittman’s Ferry, on Current River.  Pittman’s Ferry, was used by northern and southern forces alike.  The Ferry had long been a landmark for early pioneers.  Nearby Indian Ford was a crossing on a route of the Cherokee Trail of Tears.  Present day Pitman’s Ferry area contains a number of trenches, rifle pits and cannon emplacements still visible today. 

The latter part of September, 1861, the brigade was moved to southeast Missouri, and then by boat to Columbus, Kentucky, arriving on October 3, 1861.  From there, it was sent to Cave City, Barren County, Kentucky, where it spent the winter of 1861. 

While camped at Cave City, the 6th Arkansas had its first run in with a Union patrol.  On December 17, 1861, the 6th Arkansas supported the 8th Texas Calvary in a clash at Woodsonville, Kentucky.  The regiment occupied this advanced position until the fall of Fort Donelson (Tennessee), when it moved with the remainder of the Army to Corinth, Mississippi under General Albert Sydney Johnston.  Colonel Shaver next commanded the brigade gallantly at the vicious Battle of Shiloh

Battle of Shiloh

 

The Battle of Shiloh, also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing, was a major battle in the western theater of the American Civil War, fought April 6th and 7th of 1862, in Hardin County, Tennessee.  Confederate forces under Generals Albert Sidney Johnston and P.G.T. Beauregard launched a surprise attack against the Union Army of Major General Ulysses S. Grant.  The Confederates achieved considerable success on the first day but were ultimately defeated on the second day.  About 3,482 men lost their lives over this two day period. 

After the Battle of Shiloh, when Corinth, Mississippi was evacuated, Tilman Curbow’s brigade retreated to Tupelo, Mississippi where it remained until July of 1862.

As noted above, Tilman is discharged from the Army in Tupelo, Mississippi on July 6, 1862 – and presumably heads for Texas – possibly on foot.  Below is an excerpt of Tilman Curbow’s discharge report: 

“I certify that the written name, T. P. Curbow, a private of Captain L. J. Hagg’s Company (F) of the 6th Regiment of Arkansas Volunteers, aged 42 years, 5 feet 10 ½ inches high, light complexion, grey eyes, light hair and by occupation a farmer was enlisted by Col. E. M. Garrett at Arkadelphia, Ark. on the 19th day of July 1861 to serve for one year and is now entitled to discharge by reason of being a Non-Conscripted (i.e, not drafted, rather a volunteer).  The said T. P. Curbow was last paid by E. C. Jordan to include the 30th day of April 1862 and has pay due from that date to the present date.  There is due him seventy dollars traveling allowance from Tupelo, Mississippi, the place of discharge to Arkadelphia, the place of enrollment.  Transportation not being furnished in kind.”

The report goes on to say that Tilman is owed back pay for two months and 27 days of service at $11.00 per month; that he is being paid a 10 cent per mile travel allowance for 200 miles of travel; and that a deduction was being made for clothing – over-drawers.  Tilman’s final pay was $61.90.  The discharge report was signed by A. W. Steward and by T. P. Curbow.

If you would like to read more on 6th Arkansas Infantry you can read it at:  Calvin L. Collier, First In – Last Out: The Capitol Guards, Arkansas Brigade – Unit History and Muster Rolls for Company.

When we catch back up with Tilman – he is in Texas !!  He has reenlisted into the Confederate Army and is a member of Nelson’s Company of the 2nd Battalion Cavalry, Texas State Troops.  His brother Wiseman Curbow (indexed as “Carlow”) has enlisted with him and is a member of this same battalion.  The company mustered out in early 1864.  The Battalion was assigned to Townes Cavalry Brigade, Slaughter’s Divisions for [Eastern] District of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. 

Tilman P. Curbow - Civil War Muster Roll - Bowie County, Texas

The 2nd Battalion of the Texas State Troops was part of the 14th Brigade territorial militia.   According to law, all male citizens between 18-45 (later 50) were required to enroll in the territorial militia or state troops – so basically, all males of the above mentioned age that were not in the Confederate Army belonged to this reserve militia organization. 

If you believe you may have an ancestor who served in the Civil War you can check the Soldiers and Sailors Systems website.  I have a subscription to Footnote.com, and would be happy to pull a copy of your ancestor’s muster roll cards for you. 

 
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Posted by on January 4, 2011 in Civil War, Curbow

 

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Lucinda Curbow Lytle

Lucinda Curbow Lytle (my husband’s great-great grand aunt) was the first child born to Tilman P. Curbow and Elizabeth Box (18 Dec, 1843 in Georgia).  Lucinda was known to her family and friends as “Lucy.”  Lucy spent a good part of her childhood living in Itawamba County, Mississippi before coming to Texas with her family during the Civil War period. 

On August 20, 1878 Lucinda married William Henry Lytle, a Confederate Civil War veteran, in McLennan County, Texas.  Given the time period – she married late in life – at the age of 34 (her groom was 37 years old).  When I reflect upon the life of Lucinda Curbow, I very often envision her as the family caretaker.  Given that she was the oldest daughter, I think that it is entirely possible that Lucinda may have set aside her own desires for a family – and that she married later in life, because she knew that she was needed by her father to assist in running the household and taking care of her younger siblings after the death of their mother, Elizabeth.  In fact, her youngest brother, Henry Harrison Curbow, is still living with Lucy and her new husband in the 1880 census. 

It is fairly clear, based on census records, McLennan County Tax Rolls and Waco City Directories that Lucinda and her husband spent their entire married lives living together in Waco, Texas.  They had four children, but it appears that only two of them survived to adulthood, Belle Sarah and William Henry Lytle, Jr.   The family home was located east of downtown Waco on Clay Avenue.  According to a local historian that my husband and I met at the McLennan County courthouse, this location used to be a very charming Victorian section of town.  Sadly it has fallen into neglect and disrepair. 

Lytle Family Home – Clay Avenue – Waco, McLennan County, Texas

Lucinda’s husband, William Henry Lytle, died many years before she did – in 1905.  After his death, Lucinda can be found always living with her children, Belle and Edward, Jr.  In 1915, Lucy filed a Widow’s Pension Application based on her husband’s Civil War Service where the Judge describes her as, “an old lady whose mind is very feeble.” 

Lucy died 16 July, 1923 in Waco, McLennan County, Texas.  She was 80 years, 5 months and 2 days old when she died of kidney failure.

Published on MONDAY, JULY 16, 1923 in the WACO TIMES HERALD

Lucinda Curbow Lytle - Obituary

 

Lucinda is laid to rest in the Lytle family plot in Greenwood Cemetery, Waco, McLennan County, Texas.

Lytle Family Headstone/Plot - Greenwood Cemetery, Waco, McLennan County, Texas

 
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Posted by on January 2, 2011 in Lytle

 

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